Wirringa Baiya Aboriginal Womens Legal Centre

Wirringa Baiya Aboriginal Womens Legal Centre is a large-scale charity established in 1994. Their main activity is registered as prisoners' rights primarily serving early childhood - aged under 6 children - aged 6 to under 15 youth - 15 to under 25 adults - aged 25 to under 65 adults - aged 65 and over families aboriginal and torres strait islander people gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender or intersex persons people in rural/regional/remote communities financially disadvantaged people people at risk of homelessness/ people experiencing homelessness people with chronic illness (including terminal illness) people with disabilities pre/post release offenders and/or their families unemployed persons victims of crime (including family violence) females.

*We provided legal and non-legal support, referral and advice and case work to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women across NSW. *We provided legal education and resources to Aboriginal women and communities across NSW. *We participated in law reform activities to assist in addressing the needs of the Aboriginal people.

Wirringa Baiya Aboriginal Womens Legal Centre

Who They Help

  • Youth - 15 to under 25
  • Victims of crime (including family violence)
  • Unemployed persons
  • Pre/post release offenders and/or their families
  • People with disabilities
  • People with chronic illness (including terminal illness)
  • People in rural/regional/remote communities
  • People at risk of homelessness/ people experiencing homelessness
  • Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender or intersex persons
  • Financially disadvantaged people
  • Females
  • Families
  • Early childhood - aged under 6
  • Children - aged 6 to under 15
  • Adults - aged 65 and over
  • Adults - aged 25 to under 65
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Employees

Full-time
4
Part-time
4
Casual
1
Volunteers
1

Total employee expenses: $819,518 (73% of revenue).
Average full-time equivalent salary: $136,586.

Revenue vs Expenses

Wirringa Baiya Aboriginal Womens Legal Centre has seen an average annual growth of 8% in revenue versus a 4% p.a. increase in expenses. This can be a good sign of financial health.

Assets vs Liabilities

As of 2020, Wirringa Baiya Aboriginal Womens Legal Centre has a debt-to-equity (D/E) ratio of 0.27. This is considered about average within the charity space.

Sources of Revenue

Sources of Expense

Responsible People

Nicolle Lowe
Committee Member
Julie Welsh
Committee Member
Possibly also represents: BURRUNDI THEATRE FOR PERFORMING ARTS LTD.
Helen Brown
Committee Member
Regan Mitchell
Committee Member
Ashlee Donohue
Chairperson
Sharon Maza
Treasurer
Christine Robinson
Committee Member

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ABN
60382206441
Registration Status
Charity is registered.
DGR Status
Endorsed

Donations can be claimed as a tax deduction.

Office Address
Hse 13 142 Addison Rd
Marrickville
2204
Australia
Operating States
NSW
Entity Type
Other Unincorporated Entity

An other unincorporated entity is a number of people grouped together by a common purpose with club-like characteristics, for example, a sporting club, social club or trade union. Some club-like characteristics are that: there are members of the association the members will normally be free to join or leave the association the association will normally continue in existence independently of any change to the composition of the association as a matter of history, there will have been a moment in time when a number of persons combined to form the association there is a contract (which can fall short of a legally enforceable contract) binding the members among themselves, and there is a constitutional arrangement for meetings of members and for appointing officers. The meaning of any other unincorporated association or body of persons does not include a non-entity joint venture. Public Benevolent Institution

Contacts
[email protected]
[email protected]

Website
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Categories
children, nsw, law, aboriginal, torres strait, torres strait islander, violence, community legal centre, attention, marrickville, civil law